What’s an STI?

An STI is a sexually transmissible infection – an infection you can get from having sex with someone who has that infection. Chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis are examples of STIs.

What’s a BBV?

A BBV is a blood borne virus – a virus you can get if the blood, semen (cum) or vaginal fluid from someone with that virus gets into your blood. This can happen during sex or by sharing drug injecting equipment. HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C are examples of BBVs.

Rates of STIs and BBVs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities have been way too high for way too long – especially for young people in remote communities.

It’s time to turn this around. This means making regular sexual health checks a normal part of life for sexually active young people – without stigma and without shame.

We need to encourage people in remote communities to test for STIs and BBVs. This starts with educating people in remote communities about STIs and BBVs and getting whole communities involved in getting rates down.

This website is a one-stop shop for resources about STIs and BBVs affecting young people in regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. These resources have been developed and collated by the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute as part of two initiatives funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health:

  • the Remote STI and BBV Project – Young, deadly, STI and BBV free
  • the Young, deadly, syphilis free campaign

Who are the resources for?

There are resources for young people in remote Aboriginal communities, as well as resources for parents, Elders, teachers and other community leaders – with tips on how the whole community can work with young people to encourage STI and BBV testing, and knockout STIs and BBVs.

We are also developing resources for clinicians working in remote communities, providing links to testing and treatment guidelines and practical tips on engaging with young people on difficult topics such as sex, sexuality, and drug and alcohol use.